Babe Ruth

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

I was an official one day at the 2002 Winter Olympics in Ogden, Utah. When the U.S. Women’s Curling Team came off the ice after a game, I was assigned to follow one of the players around until she felt ready to present a urine sample. She yakked with friends and fans, made a cell phone call, downed some bottled water and smoked a cigarette. Eventually, she went into the lounge where the World Anti-Doping Agency had set up shop and my brief officialdom came to an end. I was introduced to her friends as “my watcher” and was uncomfortable the whole time. But

In 1931—in the middle of the Great Depression—New York Yankees slugger, Babe Ruth, demanded a salary of $80,000. When Yankee management pointed out that this was more money than Herbert Hoover, the President of the United States, was making ($75,000), Ruth retorted, “I had a better year than he did.” In my opinion, great athletes deserve great paychecks for two reasons: (1) They fill stadiums and produce giant TV ratings, and (2) Their peak earning power lasts only a few years. I was never really aware of British-born European football (soccer) player David Beckham until last week, even though he’s the most recognized sports

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