Art Sackler

Mark Michelson is the Editor-in-Chief of Printing ImpressionsServing in this role since 1985, Michelson is an award-winning journalist and member of several industry honor societies. Reader feedback is always encouraged. Email mmichelson@napco.com

"The Postal Reform Act of 2018: Improving Postal Operations, Service, and Transparency" was introduced in the U.S. Senate last week as a bipartisan bill co-sponsored by senators Tom Carper (D-Del.), Jerry Moran (R-Kan.), Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.) and Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.). If passed, the legislation would make sweeping changes to current rules and regulations that have led, in large part, to the dire long-term financial situation of the U.S. Postal Service.

The Coalition for a 21st Century Postal Service (C21) testifies today in support of HR 756, the Postal Reform Act of 2017, introduced by a bipartisan group of members of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, including its leaders. C21 says the postal service is in deep financial trouble, and this bill would constructively address, among other things, retiree health obligations that account for many billions of dollars in "postal red ink."

A range of Senate Democrats—many from red states—have serious concerns about a leading proposal to overhaul the U.S. Postal Service, adding a new impediment to Congress’s efforts to get legislation done. The Postal Service is on pace to bleed more than $20 billion over 2012 and 2013, and top officials there have urged Democrats and Republicans to come together on a legislative fix. But in the latest setback for postal reform, some Democrats say a current Senate bill would do too much to, among other things, slow down delivery standards and eat into USPS’s remaining competitive advantages

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