Alicia Orr Suman

The Direct Marketing Club of New York's annual Silver Apples awards luncheon is always a treat. The who's who of direct marketing in the NYC area—and beyond—turn out to have a few drinks, a few laughs, some lunch, some business talk, and the chance to honor our industry's best-in-class leaders. The 2005 Silver Apple winners certainly fit the bill: Ken Altman, Kay Cassidy, JoAnne Monfradi Dunn, Robert Edmund, Joe Furgiuele, Murray Miller, Chris Paradysz, and corporate winner, Boardroom Inc. Capitalizing on the NYC connection, Boardroom's Executive Vice President Brian Kurtz gave an acceptance speech that borrowed the "Late Night With David Letterman" show's

By Alicia Orr Suman A variety of strategies—including delving deeper into acquisition lists, increasing space advertising and using the Internet—are helping Wolferman's reach its true potential. Wolferman's catalog was a business with far more potential than was being tapped when Williams Foods purchased it from former parent Sara Lee Corp. in 1999. Steve Trollinger, vice president of Shawnee Mission, Kan. consulting firm J. Schmid & Associates, and someone who has worked with this specialty foods catalog firm since 2000, recalls, "Not only did Wolferman's prior management fail to take advantage of opportunities in building the business from a list perspective, they really were

Reach Those Who Teach Elementary school teachers are responsible for making their classrooms conducive to learning. While the school districts may supply the textbooks and the desks, it’s the teachers who purchase much of the other materials for their classes—including workbooks, educational toys and videos. They also buy things to make the classroom a happy and bright place—items such as job charts, weather calendars and ABC posters. “Teachers control some school funds and spend some of their own money on school supplies, as well,” explains John Jeffery, president of ClassroomDirect and Sax Arts & Crafts, both divisions of School Specialty, a Greenville, WI-based

By Alicia Orr Suman If you want to reach a general contractor, chances are you won't find him in his office. In all likelihood, he's working out of his truck. That's the busy nature of the business—especially right now; home construction is at its highest level in 17 years, according to an article titled "Building the Perfect Career" in The Philadelphia Inquirer in October. The recent home-building and home-remodeling boom means general contractors are making money. It also means they're spending a good deal—on items from tools and equipment, lumber, and other supplies to office products and computers. To sell to this market,

Marketers Need to Prepare Now For The Aging of The Baby Boom—Or Risk Losing Out on a Huge Opportunity By Alicia Orr Suman Between 1946 and 1964 in the post-WWII population bubble called the baby boom, 76 million Americans were born. In 2006, the baby boom will turn 60, and the leading edge of the baby boom generation will approach retirement and "senior" status. According to a new AARP study, Boomers at Midlife: The AARP Life Stage Study, boomers are drawn together by their collective experiences. As members of one of the largest generations in American history, they've experienced Vietnam and Watergate, the

By Alicia Orr Suman Open the Sunday paper and out pour pages of coupons and sales circulars—including offers from traditional direct marketers: collectibles, personalized products and credit cards, to name a few. But just how do direct marketers get their offers into this wide-reaching and relatively affordable medium? What to Buy More than 60 million free-standing inserts, or FSIs, circulate in newspapers every week. Because of their huge circulation, this medium reaches a significant percentage of the population, at home, with the Sunday newspaper. "The vehicle is well used by many marketers," confirms Lois Attisani, senior account executive at the brokerage and management

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