Alexander Hamilton

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

Heather Fletcher is senior content editor with Target Marketing.

What marketing tool are you most like? Are you the number-crunching analytics tool or the dreamy content creating tool reaching for the stars?

Nonprofit marketers Women On 20s asserted women were worth more than twice as much as the U.S. Department of the Treasury believed. As a result on Wednesday, the department announced Harriet Tubman would grace the front of the $20 bill, replacing the likeness of President Andrew Jackson, rather than taking up half of the space on a $10.

Groupon is honoring Presidents Day by giving customers an Alexander Hamilton — $10 off $40 spent on a deal for any local business. The promotion, which began this past weekend, allows customers to "honor our money-minded Commander-In-Chief." "The $10 bill, as everyone knows, features President Alexander Hamilton, undeniably one of our greatest presidents and most widely recognized for establishing the country's financial system," Chicago-based Groupon says on its webpage. But there's just one flaw in the promotional plan: Hamilton was never president. Hamilton is considered a Founding Father and was the country's first Secretary of the Treasury.

On Monday of this week, The New York Times launched a delicious, old-fashioned hatchet job on Australian/UK/U.S. media lord Rupert Murdoch, whose bid for The Wall Street Journal is a threat to the Pinch Sulzberger’s flagging advertising. The gist of the Times’ Monday story is that Murdoch uses his newspapers and TV networks to further his own agenda. In addition, reports the Times, he has built his $68 billion empire by bribing important politicians with campaign contributions and juicy book contracts and they, in turn, pass legislation that bends the rules to his News Corporation’s advantage. Tuesday’s story in the Times was all about

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