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Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

Marketing Sustainably: A blog posting questions, opportunities, concerns and observations on sustainability in marketing. Chet Dalzell has 25 years of public relations management and expertise in service to leading brands in consumer, donor, patient and business-to-business markets, and in the field of integrated marketing. He serves on the ANA International ECHO Awards Board of Governors, as an adviser to the Direct Marketing Club of New York, and is senior director, communications and industry relations, with the Digital Advertising Alliance. Chet loves UConn Basketball (men's and women's) and Nebraska Football (that's just men, at this point), too! 

The most successful content marketing campaigns are those that are produced as a result of a consistent strategy, which is integrated throughout the organization. Your content is effective when you see more engagement from your audience, you improve brand awareness and loyalty, and drive quality leads.

Everyone bleeds. Yet Americans hide it from themselves in television commercials, video games, movie violence, and in other ads and images by turning the red liquid — get this — blue, black or green. The British aren’t as squeamish. So should American marketing grow up?

A lot has changed since 2012 (let alone 2008), and those running for president have many options for reaching various constituencies. One thing that hasn't changed is the importance of email, which remains the primary means of communication for those seeking the White House.

What is one of the biggest challenges for email marketers? Deliverability. Do your emails get delivered to the primary inbox, show up in a bulk or spam folder, or does an ISP silently delete them?

Once, there was a Constitution-ordained, universal delivery service of hard-copy, print communications called the United States Postal Service. It was affordable, reliable and the most efficient of its kind in the world. Direct mail was its bread and butter, and many brands that sought to find and keep customers in a very targeted manner used the service avidly.

Sandra Vidulich is so excited about the leather boots she ordered through Amazon that she rips open the box in front of the postman and tries them on. "I looove them," she declares, as the driveway at her tree-lined home in rural New Zealand briefly becomes a catwalk. "They're cool." For now, a boom in Internet shopping is helping keep alive moribund postal services across the developed world. But the core of their business—letters—is declining precipitously, and data from many countries indicate that parcels alone won't be enough to save them. The once-proud postal services that helped build modern society

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