South Dakota

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

Heather Fletcher is senior content editor with Target Marketing.

Ten states will start collecting sales tax from out-of-state online retailers, thanks to a series of new laws created in response to the South Dakota vs. Wayfair case the U.S. Supreme Court decided in June.

The recent SCOTUS tax ruling may have effectively removed “physical presence” for e-commerce retailers as a nexus standard for collecting and remitting sales and use taxes. This may potentially eliminate one of the most important protections on out-of-state businesses regarding interstate commerce of the past half century.

For online retailers, few issues are as confusing and cumbersome as understanding sales tax obligations in various states. Most companies either try to find an automated solution or stick their heads in the sand and hope for the best.

It seems the rest of American video ad buyers are finding out something Target Marketing readers already knew — the plurality of video advertisement views come from thrill-seekers. About 41 percent of American video ad viewers want that adrenaline boost, Strike Social announced on Tuesday in an email sent to Target Marketing with the subject line “Thrill-seekers Watch the Most YouTube Ads.”

Adobe has taken several steps to calm concerns among its corporate users about the loss of customer account data and critical source code to hackers. The company has begun advising enterprise customers that Adobe product users will be required to change their account password at their next login attempt. The breach does not affect users of Adobe Creative Cloud or Digital Publishing Suite—other than a password reset. Adobe will also be sending notification letters over the next two weeks to customers whose individual accounts were breached

You don't see this very often: a majority of Senate Republicans voting to make people who buy stuff on the Internet pay state and local sales taxes. Anti-tax guru Grover Norquist isn't happy about it and the conservative Heritage Foundation is questioning the senators' conservative credentials. But the issue of taxing Internet sales is getting strong support from Republicans and Democrats alike. The Senate could vote as early as Thursday on a bill to empower states to require online retailers to collect state and local sales taxes for purchases made over the Internet. Under the bill, the sales taxes would

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