Salem, Mass.

For marketers who provide seasonal products, driving off-season sales is often challenging. However, by using predictive analytics, Billie Phillips, vice president of marketing at the Salem, Mass.-based candy company Harbor Sweets, was able to identify “at-risk” customers and market to them without risking valuable marketing budget dollars. Phillips used Portsmouth, N.H.-based Loyalty Builders’ Longbow analytics software to analyze customers with an order history that indicated they were buying less frequently and then apply this insight to a targeted mail campaign. With a response rate of nearly 40 percent, Harbor Sweets was able to increase results from a market that, previously, the company was slowly

For marketers who provide seasonal products, driving off-season sales is often challenging. However, by using predictive analytics, Billie Phillips, vice president of marketing at the Salem, Mass.-based candy company Harbor Sweets, was able to identify “at-risk” customers and market to them without risking valuable marketing budget dollars. Phillips used Portsmouth, N.H.-based Loyalty Builders’ Longbow analytics software to analyze customers with an order history that indicated they were buying less frequently, and then apply this insight to a targeted mail campaign. With a response rate of nearly 40 percent, Harbor Sweets was able to increase results from a market that, previously, the company was slowly

In a red brick building in Salem, Mass., within a stone’s throw of the Atlantic coast, is a small company that uses local labor to handcraft a line of gourmet chocolates sold through multiple channels to customers worldwide. This company is demonstrating that a viable multichannel selling strategy needn’t be reserved for just the behemoths in direct marketing. Harbor Sweets sells its luxury confections via a catalog, Web site, e-mail campaigns, retail channels and wholesale accounts, including Whole Foods Markets. Its overall sales have been growing 10 percent annually in recent years, and its average order value has increased 6 percent since 2004. Not

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