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Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

A massive ransomware attack has spread across at least 74 countries, hitting the IT systems of banks, telephone companies and hospitals and holding affected computers hostage for $300 in Bitcoin.

Mobile has reinvented the way travelers plan and book trips. This year, around 70 million Americans will book travel through their mobile devices, representing a spend of about $75 million. Those sales will grow to nearly $95 million in just two years.

Chances are, you don’t know what I’m talking about and creating your brand schema has never been a line item on your marketing to-do list. Yet in today’s cluttered word of information overload, understanding schema is more critical than polishing your content, engagement and customer service strategies.

The late Victor Kiam—CEO of Remington shavers—was a client of mine. A favorite expression of his was "cheapsy-weepsy." Cheapsy-weepsy describes corporate America.

The Russian parliament recently passed a bill that would require international tech companies doing business in Russia to house servers within the country's borders to service local traffic. While the local government claims this is an anti-terrorism effort, some are concerned that this violates consumer privacy rights. American tech giants such as Facebook, Twitter and Gmail store a great deal of personal data about their customers across the globe, wherever they do business. Americans are generally concerned about privacy and the implications of the law on their customers. However, failing to comply could result in being banished from an entire country and losing a portion of your subscriber base.

In early April, I received a press release about Americans losing millions of jobs annually. It was a mess. As you can see, this is a gray wall of tiny type. "Avoid gray walls of type," counseled the great guru David Ogilvy.

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