Philadelphia Park

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

In the mid-1950s, when I was attending Columbia College, I worked nights and weekends as a page at NBC in New York. In those days, television was black-and-white and always live. After squeezing fat tourists into thin seats, we pages were free to watch the show—from the back of the studio audience, the stage door or the control room. During those three years, I must have seen, in person, every major and minor star in the NBC galaxy, as well as those from other networks and Hollywood, since we also were assigned to work the Academy Awards and the Emmys. I was able to

This past January, the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board announced its decision to issue licenses for two slot machine parlors on the Philadelphia riverfront at either end of Delaware Avenue. Onto this road—which is already choking with traffic—it is forecast that 20,000 to 30,000 cars a day will be injected into the mix. The nearest subway stops are one mile away. If this nightmare comes to pass, some 70 to 90 stores will be forced to close, because regular customers—not wanting to sit in traffic for two hours—will evaporate and shop elsewhere (myself included). The Jan. 11, 2007 issue of this publication described the catastrophe

The 139-word Bloomberg News release—that Pinnacle Entertainment is selling shares for casino funding—ends on a sour note. Pinnacle lost out in its bid for a slot machine parlor in Philadelphia to the proprietors of the largest casino complex in the world, Foxwoods, which is owned and operated by Connecticut’s Mashantucket Pequot tribe. The new Foxwoods Casino—slot machines only—that won the license, will be sited on the west bank of the Delaware River, roughly 1-1/2 miles from our 1817 row house in South Philadelphia. My neighbor, novelist-actor Steve Zettler, wrote a letter to The Philadelphia Inquirer that oozed sanctimony. “It goes beyond the obvious

Absolute courage in the face of absolute adversity Sept. 13, 2005--Vol. 1, Issue #30 IN THE NEWS Philadelphia Park starter Russell "Rusty" Downes will face "internal disciplinary and economic sanctions" after leaving a filly behind the starting gate in Monday's Pennsylvania Oaks. Downes, 65, has dispatched runners from the gate for 35 years at numerous tracks but had never left one behind until Private Gift was ignored while five other runners were sent on their way in the $100,000 stakes race. --Craig Donnelly "Penalty is promised after big error at gate"

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