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Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

Heather Fletcher is senior content editor with Target Marketing.

Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams of Columbus, Ohio, is in a region of the country where it has some heavy competition—literally. Dairy farms abound, and aficionados of butterfat-laden desserts have plenty to choose from. But more than the long lines outside its retail store in the trendy Short North section of the state capital betray the gourmet confectioner's popularity. Jeni's is among many regional specialty food retailers that have learned how to sell food online.

I have a huge file on the European Union and the myriad ways bureaucrats in Brussels insinuate themselves and their personal agendas into every facet of business and life. They dictate what can and cannot be done in terms of work rules, consumer marketing, competition, the media, nannies, light bulbs, data and so much more. In November, the EU issued a directive on noise abatement that included how loud symphony orchestras are allowed to play. Last week I read the story of how the state of Pennsylvania wants to shut down the thriving eBay auction business of single mom Mary Jo Pletz, which enables

Paris has Venus De Milo; Florence has Michelangelo’s David; New York has the Statue of Liberty; Copenhagen has the Little Mermaid; Brussels has Manneken Pis—a fat naked little boy proudly relieving himself in a fountain. Now London is going Brussels one better by placing giant billboards throughout Belgium—in Antwerp, Brussels, Liege and Ghent. The image is a grown male skinhead in jeans—with a big red cross painted on his bare back—creating a great arching stream as he proudly relieves himself into a teacup atop a small, round Hepplewhite table a few feet away. The purpose of the billboards is to promote Eurostar’s new

The Heavy Airbus and The Wall Street Journal Lite Nov. 29, 2005: Vol. 1, Issue No. 51 IN THE NEWS Change in Rules Needed for Wake of Big New Jet Airliners may have to fly twice the normal distance behind the new Airbus A380 superjumbo jet to avoid potential hazards from its unusually powerful wake, according to preliminary safety guidelines. --Andy Pasztor and Daniel Michaels, The Wall Street Journal, Nov. 22, 2005 Picture this. For you, it's been a solid week of nasty, contentious meetings and sleepless nights in London, Brussels and Paris. Finally, very early Friday morning you take a taxi

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