The World’s Worst Business Model: U.S. Health Care

 

Be Honest if You Want Their Business

Consumers are tired of not being told the truth in marketing, and since they can see it clearly themselves, all marketing that does not pass muster is summarily ignored. (Yes, we like Dijon, too.) To win back consumer trust, marketers need to be clear and honest about their products—no exceptions, thank you. All disclaimers must be avoided. Rid ye of what is called mouseprint, before it gets rid of ye. —excerpted from “Punk Marketing,” by Richard Laermer and Mark Simmons (Collins, March 2007, $25.95); for more www.harpercollins.com


The World’s Worst Business Model: U.S. Health Care

The story of Vicki H. Readling is typical. She made $60,000 as a freelance insurance broker last year, but could no longer afford health benefits, because with her history of cancer, a health policy would cost $27,000. After taxes, she would be left with maybe $15,000 a year to live on. Yesterday’s story of Readling was just one of many in the media last week about the state of our sad-sack health care dilemma. Among the others: * A Miami Herald piece that suggested Americans who need surgery should go abroad where procedures can be performed for a fraction of what they cost here.