How to Deal With the Media Denying Access Is Probably Not a Good Idea

 

BCS062206_ReadersResponse

Readers Respond to “Immigration: Put a Direct Marketing Writer in Charge,” published June 20, 2006, which urged that all the facts of a situation be put on the table before a major decision is made. I greatly appreciated your article on pursuing hard facts before forming policy (we wouldn’t pitch a product without knowing the real benefits.) And here it comes....I visited the cheap tomato Web site and I believe this is nothing more than a racist, conservative spin article. My boyfriend is from South America and education is a very high priority for families—note Chile’s continuing expansion in education. What this ‘farmer’ describes


How to Deal With the Media Denying Access Is Probably Not a Good Idea

A great family friend was Stan Swinton, World Service vice president of the Associated Press—a brilliant, hard-driving, hard-living charmer, who spent much of his life on jet planes and knew just about everyone worth knowing in 104 countries. At some point during the Vietnam War on a pub-crawl with Stan, I asked why reporters covering the White House frequently lobbed softball questions at the president. “Access,” he replied. “The government has the power to deny access. If you don’t have access, you do get news.” I thought about it and realized that no access means no presidential press conferences, no trips on Air Force 1, no battlefield