How Not to Run a Meeting—or a Business

 

BCS72706_ReadersRespond

NOTE: Denny personally responds to all e-mail correspondences (unless the e-mail address is somehow missing). Readers Respond to “Eminent Domains: Is Yours One?” published July 25, 2006. Love your newsletter, and it is a big part of inspiring me to think differently about everything, and to observe and pay attention to the obvious. I just came across a new phone service, but maybe it is not so new in your world, and I think it will be an interesting thing for you to get perspective on. Most people under age 30 are so electronic savvy, and the amp’d mobile is the phone they have been waiting


How Not to Run a Meeting—or a Business

One reason I got out of the corporate environment is that I cannot stand meetings. I am efficient at a computer keyboard, not in a roomful of people. My wife, Peggy—now publisher of six magazines, a line of business books and online products, and proprietor of a trade show—is a master at running a tight meeting. Business gets done; people get out on time. Somebody suggested that all meetings should be held in a room with no chairs—no place to sit. When people are forced to stand, agendas are completed with amazing alacrity. If you think corporate meetings are basically time wasters, take a look