Corporate Culture and Information Flow

 

Corporate Culture and Information Flow

The Hierarchical Model vs. Hub-and-Spoke March 9, 2006: Vol. 2, Issue No. 19 IN THE NEWS Bush in a bubble: Is he cut off from political reality? From Iraq to Katrina to the ports flap, many observers view him as insular. We have seen this phenomenon before--a cloistered president, fixed in his views and averse to compromise, often at odds with political reality. Democrat Woodrow Wilson was protected by a first lady who froze out even his closest aides. Democrat Lyndon Johnson raged against his domestic critics, calling them "communists" and "Harvards," and he wound up speaking only at military bases. Republican Richard


Corporate Culture and Information Flow

The Hierarchical Model vs. Hub-and-Spoke March 9, 2006: Vol. 2, Issue No. 19 IN THE NEWS Bush in a bubble: Is he cut off from political reality? From Iraq to Katrina to the ports flap, many observers view him as insular. We have seen this phenomenon before--a cloistered president, fixed in his views and averse to compromise, often at odds with political reality. Democrat Woodrow Wilson was protected by a first lady who froze out even his closest aides. Democrat Lyndon Johnson raged against his domestic critics, calling them "communists" and "Harvards," and he wound up speaking only at military bases. Republican Richard


Taking Risks,
Increasing Response

Assurity Life Insurance Co. is a study in innovation, change and risk-taking—from its history to its direct mail program. Innovation: In 1890, Dr. E. O. Faulkner created Modern Woodmen Accident Association because he saw a need to make accident coverage available to working people—not just the wealthy. This Lincoln, Neb., company continued to expand and add products over the next century. Change: In 1954, three Woodmen companies were merged to create Woodmen Accident and Life Co., and in 1997, the Assurity Life Insurance Co. was formed as a subsidiary of Woodmen Accident and Life. Risk-taking: Assurity Direct, the direct marketing division of Assurity Life,


What’s Your Frequency?

Now that the days of simply blanketing your customer database with e-mails are long past, optimizing your e-mail contact patterns is as much about understanding where your customers are in the purchasing cycle and optimal timing, as it is about how often you mail. Optimizing for the long term takes testing, planning and a good understanding of your customers’ behavior patterns. All these factors will help you formulate a contact strategy that’s relevant to your customers, ideally lifting response rates and keeping unsubscribe rates low. Analyze This A successful e-mail contact strategy depends on an analysis of customer preferences, as well as