Book Pirates! Diary of an Amateur Web Sleuth

 

BCS071806_ReadersResponse

Readers Respond to “The Decline and Fall of AOL,” published July 13, 2006. I want to share a couple of items to the history of AOL’s success. Jan Brandt left Field Publications as Advertising Director just at the time that Primedia, then K-III Communications, bought Field and included it with the Direct Marketing Group, of which Newbridge Communications (formerly Macmillan Book Clubs) was the anchor. Gryphon Editions was a division of Newbridge. I think the Field acquisition occurred in 1991. I also think Jan went to AOL directly from Field. Newfield, as it was renamed, slowly began to deteriorate. In 1993 K-III’s senior management,


Book Pirates! Diary of an Amateur Web Sleuth

“Businesses based on theft are falling by the wayside or going legit, and a legal marketplace is showing real signs of promise,” wrote Mitch Bainwol, chairman and CEO, Recording Industry Association of America, and Dan Glickman, chairman and CEO, Motion Picture Association of America, in The Wall Street Journal on July 1. Maybe in the world of DVDs, CDs and software. The genteel world of book publishing is another story. Sure, the Harry Potter books have been counterfeited and are selling across Asia. But I was stunned to find that an obscure book written 50 years ago by my father, that’s still under copyright, was appropriated