YouTube

The Babe Went Out With the Bath Water
February 6, 2007

Judith Regan, a 53-year-old self-proclaimed hottie, has been called by Vanity Fair “the Angriest Woman in Media.” She reportedly cussed out employees on a regular basis with the “f” word, the “s” word and, in doing so, routinely alluded to male and female anatomies—her own included—with various “c” words. According to one former editor, Regan went through 18 personal assistants in 2005. “Say what you want about the fearless, foul-mouthed former publisher of ReganBooks,” wrote Steve Kettmann in the San Francisco Chronicle, “it would be hard to deny she has probably been the single most influential force in publishing over the past decade.” She

Six Ways to Embrace Social Networks
January 24, 2007

As more forms of pull marketing come into play, companies are faced with learning a whole new way to interact with their target audiences. Online social networks, such as MySpace, YouTube and Friendster, can be daunting to those marketers more comfortable with Consumer Reports magazine than ConsumerReports.org. Heck, it’s daunting even to the tech savvy, simply because these new media vehicles represent uncharted territory with little in the way of testing history to guide your marketing efforts. Rachel Honig, COO of Digital Power and Light, an online marketing firm in New York City that designs digital promotions, offers a few insights on how to best

Editor’s Notes: UGC? Try UGP!
January 1, 2007

User-generated content, or UGC, has been one of the hottest trends, and thus, buzzwords in recent years. Part media revolution and part marketing innovation, UGC takes the form of customer product reviews, blogs and sites that allow participants to share images, videos and text (think MySpace, YouTube). Not long ago, at least one of these media forms would have been alien to the masses. Now, UGC is fast becoming commonplace. And that means it’s time for the next acronym. Let’s call it UGP, which stands for user-generated product. (I have no hopes that this term will stick, but seeing that the only catchphrase for this

Editor’s Notes: Trends Not to Ignore
November 1, 2006

When I was editor of Inside Direct Mail, I kept my eye out for trends in the mailstream. And there have been many to see throughout the years: vouchers, double postcards, repositionable notes, oversize efforts, billboards, magalogs. But mailstream trends aren’t the only ones worth noting these days. Cultural trends also can be worth consideration when crafting direct marketing messages. Given that consumers expect advertising and marketing to reflect their personal tastes and lifestyles—even their particular aspirations—copy and imagery must keep pace with these developing trends. A whitepaper on mega-trends from brand consultancy Hiebing crossed my desk a few months back, and it identified eight