Williams-Sonoma

Delight Your Customers
April 1, 2002

Fulfilling Customers' Orders ... and Expectations By Denny Hatch The next time a wonk gets up at a direct marketing conference and parrots the current industry buzzwords—customer relationship management, retention marketing, back-end marketing and customer satisfaction—stand up and let fly with a noisy raspberry cheer. Consign these tired platitudes to the scrap heap of bad ideas. Anyone with half a brain and half a computer can satisfy a customer. But only when you continually delight customers will they keep coming back. The Tale of the Lexus A friend of consultant Don Jackson bought a Lexus—a $45,000 piece of machinery. He could afford a

Epicurean Enthusiasts
March 1, 2002

Direct Marketers Find Success With This Savory Demographic Edited By Kate Mason They'd rather stay in on a Saturday night and try a new Manchurian pork and zucchini dumpling recipe they've recently read about in their favorite culinary magazine. They know the difference between a cassoulet and a casserole, and they'd even travel 100 miles out of their way in search of the perfect cabernet for their next dinner party. Who are they? They're gourmet cooking enthusiasts—and, as a group they have enough discretionary income to whet direct marketers' appetites. The Cooking Crowd "Gourmet cooking is a hobby shared by

Who Are the Best of the Best? (1,161 words)
November 1, 2000

Customer service can make or break a company. What's the old saying, "Once bitten, twice shy"? Many customers simply won't give you a second chance if you screw up an order or don't treat them right in the first place. Provide them with the tender loving care they think they deserve, or they'll simply take their business elsewhere. That's the bad news. The good news is that the reverse is also true in many cases. Treat your customers well, and you'll have their business for life. So what does it mean to take good care of customers in the high-tech high-touch environment

Gift Giving - 365 Days a Year
June 1, 2000

By Pat Friesen So you make 80 percent of your sales during the last two months of the year? Would you like to flatten the peaks and valleys of the gift-purchase business? Do you want to increase your gift sales overall? You can do it, but it won't happen magically. You've got to be proactive about encouraging customers to use you as a source of year-round gifts. Here's how. Reasons to Give For starters, make a list of all the possible reasons your customers give gifts. Then remind customers that you deliver hassle-free gifts for all of these occasions and more. For "reasons