Time Inc.

Famous Last Words - Jayme
July 1, 2001

By Denny Hatch Bill Jayme: In His Own Words Note: Bill Jayme's first promotional effort, "The Cool Friday" letter for LIFE, was reproduced in the October 2000 issue of TM. This is Jayme's last promotional effort, written for The New York Times, which failed to run it. —D.H. Bill Jayme, a direct mail copywriter prominent in magazine publishing circles, died in his home in Sonoma, CA on May 18. The cause of death was emphysema. He was 75. Over the past 30 years, Jayme and his partner, Finnish-born graphics designer Heikki Ratalahti, created the mailing packages ("junk mail") that successfully launched more than three dozen

All About Customer Relationship Management (CRM) (1,592 words)
July 1, 2001

By Ed Fischer and David Raab In today's competitive arena, marketing the right product to the right person at the right time can spell success. Customer relationship management (CRM) technologies can help. But how do you decide what solutions to select? David M. Raab, a marketing technology consultant and partner of Chappaqua, NY-based Raab Associates, is considered one of the top industry experts on CRM systems. Ed Fischer, contributing editor of Target Marketing magazine, talked with Raab about the state of CRM technology and how marketers can better select solutions that meet their needs. Target Marketing: What is an adequate definition

"The Four Components of Every Offer" (510 words)
July 1, 2001

By Bill Baird Offers that require a promise to pay are called "hard" offers. "Soft" offers, on the other hand, don't require such a promise. Because they reduce the commitment required from the customer, soft offers increase gross response by 50 percent to 200 percent. This results in higher gross sales, but also a higher cancelation rate. A combination of the two, however, often produces higher net sales after cancels, which makes the offer pay off for you, the marketer. One example of soft payment terms is to allow customers free, no-risk trial offers of the product. You promise that they can begin to get trial shipments or services with no obligation to pay. If customers decide not to continue, they can write "cancel" on your bill or call and tell you not to charge their credit cards, and the customers will owe nothing further. Tip: Emphasize the free trial/no risk terms of this offer in many prominent locations in your promotion. Also remind customers in several places that they can keep their first shipments (or benefit from your services during the trial period) even if they decide not to continue. Payment Terms

The Rise and Fall of Time Life Books (2,310 words)
June 1, 2001

By Denny Hatch Oct. 4, 1957, is etched in my memory almost as clearly as the day Kennedy was shot. That October day, the Russians launched sputnik, leaving the U.S. space program at the starting gate. I stood on Columbia University's main campus talking with fellow students while this satellite whizzed over our heads, all of us fully expecting Armageddon. During a speech in Poland the previous year, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev said to the West, "We will be at your burial." During this period, American school children practiced regular air raid drills. Survivalists spent small fortunes outfitting backyard air raid shelters.

First-time parents make terrific prospects (875 words)
May 1, 2001

By Donna Loyle Each year, 4 million new babies are born in the United States—40 percent to first-time parents. And new parents have a need to buy, well, just about everything for their infants. A new mother is, in essence, a new consumer, says Steve Kantor, publisher of New Parent magazine. "Having a baby is one of the biggest, if not the biggest, lifestage event. As such, new mothers are open to new products that can enhance their lives and their babies' lives." As in any primary life change, new parents are in a prime buying mode. In addition to the predictable products—baby

CRM Special Report- 8 Critical Factors That Make or Break CRM
April 1, 2001

By William F. Brendler The CEO of a large manufacturing company was frustrated at the slow progress his company was making transitioning from a product-focused company to a customer-centric one. Each time the top management team met, the main topic reverted to problems executives were having regarding their customers. The meetings ended in conflicts that managers couldn't resolve. Problems were identified: It took five days on average to enter, process and fill orders—an eternity in today's fast-paced business climate. CSRs didn't have instant access to product information, and they delayed customers on the phone while they located account information. The inability

TM0301_Market Focus, Judaica (1,517 words)
March 1, 2001

Targeting this close-knit niche can be hard, but also rewarding By Brendan Maher As far as market share goes, Christmas is the clear winner over Hanukkah. Its popularity as a major marketing event isn't even matched by the Super Bowl (yet). At least one person tried to change that: "So, if it feels like you're the only kid on the block without a Christmas tree, here's a list of people that are Jewish just like you and me." Saturday Night Live's Adam Sandler may have been joking when he went on to list famous Jews from David Lee Roth to Mr. Spock in

Direct Mail Round-up - Renewals (626 words)
February 1, 2001

Pump Some Life Into Your Renewal Campaign By Hallie Mummert The explosion of interest in customer retention is probably a bit amusing to circulation professionals, who have always been aware of the need to continue selling to customers, whether recently acquired or long-term. Quite simply, a periodical doesn't have a business if it doesn't have customers who come back year after year. Not all renewal packages work as hard to resell the product as the acquisition package, but I've dug up a few mailings this month that go a little further than the standard renewal effort. What can you do to give your renewal

Internet Special Report - Working the Phone as a CRM Tool (1,58
January 1, 2001

By Jim Wheaton and Mark Harjes 7 Rules FOR PROSPECT and Customer Relationship Management in a Call Center Environment Successful Prospect and Customer Relationship Management (P/CRM) requires the coordinated leveraging of multiple communications channels. With this in mind, consider the following seven guidelines for taking maximum advantage of inbound and outbound call centers as part of your overall CRM program. 1. Even when prospecting, tailor the screen script to the target audience. Generally, prospect universes are comprised of distinct subsets. In many vertical industries, one group will have a high propensity to respond but, having converted to customer status, will generate modest long-term

Working the Phone as a CRM Tool (1,572 words)
January 1, 2001

by Jim Wheaton and Mark Harjes Successful Prospect and Customer Relationship Management (P/CRM) requires the coordinated leveraging of multiple communications channels. With this in mind, consider the following seven guidelines for taking maximum advantage of inbound and outbound call centers as part of your overall CRM program. 1. Even when prospecting, tailor the screen script to the target audience. Generally, prospect universes are comprised of distinct subsets. In many vertical industries, one group will have a high propensity to respond but, having converted to customer status, will generate modest long-term value. Conversely, a second group will be less likely to respond but, once