Spring

5 E-mail Marketing Spring Cleaning Tips
February 13, 2009

With spring approaching, it’s time to get your broom and start sweeping out the e-mail marketing program you’ve been meaning to spruce up all winter.

Direct Mail Spotlight: Green America
February 6, 2009

What's the best way to get inside a prospect's mind? There are surveys, focus groups, market research and customer service centers to collect information about an audience, but sometimes basic direct mail testing is the most straightforward and profitable way to find out which approaches work best

A Winning Test
February 1, 2009

What's the best way to get inside a prospect's mind? There are surveys, focus groups, market research and customer service centers to collect information about an audience, but sometimes basic direct mail testing is the most straightforward and profitable way to find out which approaches work best.

Continuous Improvement
October 1, 2008

Over time, fulfillment programs can grow complicated and unwieldy, becoming less efficient if marketers do not carefully assess the impact of incremental changes to materials and processes. To keep a program running in Olympic form, marketers should invest in regular audits that take into account the full spectrum of operations and materials needed to achieve the desired goal - balancing cost with response.

Doctors Foster and Smith’s Gordon Magee on Meeting Customers’ Expectations Online
June 25, 2008

Last month, research firm ForeSee Results announced the outcome of its Spring 2008 Top 100 Online Retail Satisfaction Index. Moving up from a fifth-place overall finish in the last rankings to No. 4 in the most recent release is the e-commerce site for Doctors Foster and Smith, the Rhinelander, Wisc.-based multichannel marketer of pet supplies and pharmaceuticals. The firm’s site also took top honors in the Specialty/Nonapparel subcategory. Target Marketing Tipline called on Gordon Magee, Doctors Foster and Smith’s Internet marketing and analysis manager, to learn some of his company’s tricks of the trade for improving the online shopping experience for customers. Target Marketing:

One to Watch: Spring-Green
June 12, 2008

“Activity Highlights” focused on merchandise mailers targeting the homeowner, and our “One to Watch” is yet another example. A lawn care company, it faces surprisingly stiff competition in the mailbox from other lawn care providers. Why so stiff? Partly because the window of opportunity for lawn care companies is short, as in most regions of the country lawn care needs to begin in the spring and then carry through the early fall. And, unlike merchandise (like pet supplies, supplements and cosmetics) that can abandoned for a competitor a few weeks later after purchase, choosing a lawn care provider is often a year-long commitment.

Mail Activity Highlights: Merchandise
June 12, 2008

To quote our Who’s Mailing What! Archive director, Paul Bobnak, “Merchandise mail in March is like forsythia, as it appears before everything else comes up.” For merch mail, that means it shows the beginning of home improvement marketing mail, including everything from roofing, painting, kitchen overhauls, new beds, appliance insurance, pest-proofing and lawn care. Interlock Industries, with its lifetime roofing system, uses a #10 outer that gets homeowners’ immediate attention: “Never reroof again. NEVER.” Because reroofing is one of the big expenses, it’s the kind of product promise that will get the envelope opened. The four-color brochure shows effective before-after pictures, and the

One to Watch: Town & Country
April 10, 2008

Numerous acquisition efforts came from magazines published by Hearst this month, and several were practically identical but inventive voucher packages. They included O, Redbook, Esquire, House Beautiful and Town & Country—and all were 4-1/4˝ x 9-1/4˝. We’ve chosen to nominate Town & Country as the “One to Watch” (Archive code #202-173842-0801), but any of this bunch could be featured. Why so worthy? Because they expand on the voucher format in several creative, and potentially profitable, ways. First, the voucher page of Town & Country chooses a different tactic than simply listing bland benefits. Instead, it presents 2008’s “special editorial events.” If this magazine is

At Museums, the Customer Matters Least
May 17, 2007

On two successive evenings last week—at the New York auction houses, Christie’s and Sotheby’s—a half-billion dollars worth of art changed hands. I am fascinated by the art world—the work itself, the lives of the artists, collectors great and small, and the value and prices that art commands. Plus, of course, the business of auctions and museums is intriguing. Relatively few people have money to buy great works of art for their homes and yachts. Fortunately for the rest of us, many of the great collectors either founded public museums of their own or left their art to established institutions. Since no advertisements were booked