Radio Shack

What the Hell Is Happening to Retail?
April 20, 2017 at 8:00 am

Retail is having a moment. Since the calendar flipped to 2017, we’ve seen more bankruptcies than all of last year. What’s going on?

Google Introduces Targeting Improvements to Help More Marketers 'Get Local' for Holidays
November 19, 2012

While this will be a true multichannel holiday, the overwhelming number of actual purchases (north of 90 percent) will still be made in stores. Yet those purchases will be highly influenced by PC, tablet and smartphone usage. More than 80 to 90 percent of online consumers do research before buying offline. This has been documented by several surveys and it makes anecdotal and intuitive sense. Yet most marketers appear to have not fully understood this until recently. In recognition of this “online-offline” consumer shopping pattern (and especially for Q4) Google is introducing a range of improvements and upgrades.

How 7 Display Ads Convert Their Clicks: Customer Acquisition Chain Link 7
May 4, 2012

We clicked on seven banner ads during February 2012. Online display has enjoyed a major growth spurt and is likely to pass paid search in terms of spend in the next couple of years. It’s all the more reason to get customer acquisition chain (CAC) done right. Here is our analysis of the display ads we reviewed.

Valuing Facebook's Ads
November 11, 2010

Facebook Inc. is attracting more advertising, but marketers are still trying to figure out the value of those ads. New data from comScore Inc. show that in September 24 percent of all online display ads in the U.S. appeared on Facebook—more than twice as many as any other publisher.

Lillian Vernon, Sharper Image Crash. Why?
February 25, 2008

The king of high-end tchotchkes (Richard Thalheimer, former CEO and chairman of The Sharper Image) and queen of low-end tchotchkes (Lillian Vernon) have been dethroned. Lillian Vernon and Sharper Image—two iconic catalogs—were known to have been struggling in recent years. Their bankruptcies were expected. That they were announced on the same day is astonishing. How could this happen? Both Vernon and Thalheimer launched businesses without paying their dues. Ultimately, neither of them knew what the hell they were doing. Lillian Vernon’s Story In 1933, Lillian Katz’s family fled the Nazis. They left Leipzig, Germany, for Amsterdam, and four years later were lucky enough to

Database Makeovers
July 1, 2004

Five companies turn data dilemmas into marketing solutions Too often, companies think of their databases as … databases: collections of names and numbers, of dates and dollar amounts. And technically, that’s what they are. But if you think of your database as just names and numbers, that’s all you’ll get out of it. Your data is your record of customer interaction; as such, it is your most valuable commodity. Like the story of the jeweler who locked up his customer list—not his diamonds—in his safe each night, marketers must revere their databases. The sad fact, however, is that much data is in disarray.

Do's & Don'ts in the Privacy Era
November 1, 2003

By Donna Loyle The rise of targeted marketing principles and the implementation of efficient data-collection and -sharing practices has been one of the driving forces of the American economy for the last several decades. Of that, no one is in dispute—not even government officials. But the migration from mass marketing to direct marketing also has a down side. Some consumers, tired of having targeted offers thrust at them from all angles, are experiencing marketing fatigue. And they're starting to say: "Enough already!" Add to the mix the alarming rise in identity theft, computer-clogging spam and telemarketing, and you

The Yin and Yang of American Consumers
September 1, 2002

By Denny Hatch A guy I know bought two Fedders air conditioning units and a VCR from American Appliance, an independent discount appliance chain in my area. One of the machines didn't work, and he phoned the store. The line was perpetually busy. He went to the store during regular hours and was told the store was closed. "When will it be open?" "I am telling you, the store is closed," was the reply. It turns out GE Capital called in its markers, and the 33-year-old, privately held American Appliance instantly shut all 24 stores and fired its 700 employees. For The Philadelphia Inquirer