Leon Henry, Inc.

Insert Media Buying Guide: Get a Strong Insert Media Prospecting Program
September 1, 2004

Insider tips for successfully testing insert media—and expanding your usage W ith it looking more and more likely that postal reform might not get passed before this session of Congress ends, the threat of a double-digit postal rate increase hangs over the direct marketing industry. Historically, postage hikes have spurred direct marketers to trade some direct mail circulation for insert media program tests. But postal woes isn’t the only reason for the increased interest in insert media options: With list universes down from where they used to be and merge/purge rates at an all-time high, many direct marketers have added insert media to their

The Science of Insert Media Production
August 1, 2004

How to keep your costs in line The aspect of insert media that scares off many a curious direct marketer is the level of commitment needed to get optimal results. Not only must you test a variety of programs, creative approaches and offers to find winning combos, but you have to plan out your insertions so you can take advantage of production economies. Granted, media placement costs are higher than those associated with insert printing. But that does not mean you shouldn’t look to control your production expenditures. By giving some thought to format, paper, timing and distribution, you can open up a channel

How to Make Your Insert Media Stand Out
February 1, 2004

By Noelle Skodzinski If you tested one insert program a day, it would take you four years and counting to test them all. "There are more than 1,500 insert programs available today," says Leon Henry, chairman/CEO of Leon Henry Inc., a 50-year-old insert and list management and brokerage firm. "And there will be more." The insert field received additional attention when it augmented its popularity, at least in industry press, with the renaming of the Direct Marketing Association's (DMA) Alternate Response Media Council to the Insert Media Council, which held its first-ever Insert Media Day in the fall of 2003. "It's

How to Make Your Insert Stand Out
February 1, 2004

By Noelle Skodzinski If you tested one insert program a day, it would take you four years and counting to test them all. "There are more than 1,500 insert programs available today," says Leon Henry, chairman/CEO of Leon Henry Inc., a 48-year-old insert and list management and brokerage firm. "And there will be more." The insert field has received additional attention of late, augmenting its popularity at least in industry press, with the recent renaming of the Direct Marketing Association's (DMA) Alternate Response Media Council to the Insert Media Council, which held the first-ever Insert Media Day last fall. "It's certainly becoming

How to Buy FSIs
August 1, 2003

By Alicia Orr Suman Open the Sunday paper and out pour pages of coupons and sales circulars—including offers from traditional direct marketers: collectibles, personalized products and credit cards, to name a few. But just how do direct marketers get their offers into this wide-reaching and relatively affordable medium? What to Buy More than 60 million free-standing inserts, or FSIs, circulate in newspapers every week. Because of their huge circulation, this medium reaches a significant percentage of the population, at home, with the Sunday newspaper. "The vehicle is well used by many marketers," confirms Lois Attisani, senior account executive at the brokerage and management

The Elevator Pitch
May 1, 2003

How to Tell People What You Do: Quickly, Simply, Compellingly By Lois K. Geller It all started at an ARM luncheon a while back. ARM is the association for Alternative Response Media, the folks who sell space in card decks, fulfillment packages, etc. I was there because they were honoring my friend Joel Katz from Leon Henry Inc. I sat at a table where I didn't know a soul. I introduced myself. "I'm Lois Geller, president of Mason & Geller." Since they might not have heard the name, I added, "a full service direct marketing agency." I noticed their eyes glazing over, so

Celebrating 25 Years of Change
May 1, 2002

By Alicia Orr Suman Spring 1978. The first issue of ZIP magazine hit the mail. And on the cover of that predecessor to this magazine were the faces of men and women—"Some Leaders in the Direct Marketing Field," stated the headline. The features listed in the Table of Contents of that premier issue (right) have an eerie resemblance to the subjects we now cover 25 years later: • What Is the Future of the Postal Service? • Personal Privacy in an Information Society • Facsimile Machines, For the Office of the Future • Computer Networks: The New Information Robots • Alternate Delivery: Post-Mortem for

Below The Radar--And Working (1,977 words)
October 1, 2001

Mailers are having success with package Inserts, co-ops, Blow-ins and statement stuffers—they'd just rather not talk about it By Alicia Orr The title for this piece came from a conversation I had with Leon Henry during the Annual Catalog Conference in Boston last June. "You know," said Henry, chairman of Leon Henry Inc., "inserts fly below the radar screen. We're quite a large industry if you'd take the time to look. We're a factor and no one knows it." So I accepted Henry's challenge and decided to tackle this story. No easy task. It's difficult, if not impossible, to accurately quantify the size of

Ready for Alternate Media Yet?
June 1, 2001

By Hallie Mummert Next month, the postal rates will rise again for the second time this year. Here's a little more salt for the wound: In the past seven months, your postage costs most likely have increased by an average of $14/M to $16/M for letter-size mailings and $18/M to $33/M for flat-size mailings. Is it any wonder that managers and brokers of alternate media programs are seeing more interest in these less costly alternatives to solo direct mail? "Anytime you see an increase on a fixed cost of doing business or a declining of response rates, you will find mailers

First-time parents make terrific prospects (875 words)
May 1, 2001

By Donna Loyle Each year, 4 million new babies are born in the United States—40 percent to first-time parents. And new parents have a need to buy, well, just about everything for their infants. A new mother is, in essence, a new consumer, says Steve Kantor, publisher of New Parent magazine. "Having a baby is one of the biggest, if not the biggest, lifestage event. As such, new mothers are open to new products that can enhance their lives and their babies' lives." As in any primary life change, new parents are in a prime buying mode. In addition to the predictable products—baby