Franklin Covey

Production and Paper Special Report: Success From Any Angle
June 1, 2006

About five years ago, Eric Bright first saw the Flapper™, a dimensional mail piece that unfolds and re-folds to present four different messaging panels. While Bright, senior director of consumer marketing at Franklin Covey, a provider of effectiveness training, productivity tools and assessment services based in Salt Lake City, thinks the mailer featured the Nickelodeon cartoon character SpongeBob Squarepants, he’s positive he and his colleagues couldn’t stop playing with the effort’s reconfigurable panels. So the team decided in the summer of 2001 to test a Flapper, a format that is patented by Intervisual Communications, a dimensional print and promotions company acquired this past March by

CRM What Does It Mean?
August 1, 2002

Customer Relationship Marketing? Customer Relationship Management? How About: Customers Rarely Matter? By Lois K. Geller I am a shopper. And I buy from many companies in their stores, on their Web sites, through direct mail and from catalogs. I buy cosmetics online from Sephora.com, airline tickets from Expedia.com, books and music from Amazon.com, and clothes from Lord and Taylor and Loehmann's. But honestly, other than Amazon and Loehmann's, few companies do anything but take my money and deliver the goods. They almost never make the extra effort to develop a relationship with me—or as Ford Motor Co. puts it, "surprise and delight" me in

Internet Special Report--E-mail Done Right (1,783 words)
August 1, 2001

Best Practices for this exploding medium By Edward Fischer Done right, e-mail marketing can bring you new customers and more revenue at a lower cost than ever before. Done wrong, it can generate virtually no response. Worse, it can alienate, confuse or anger your current customers. About 536 billion e-mail messages were sent in the United States during 2000, according to New Century Communications. With about 100 million e-mail users in the United States, that comes to more than 5,000 messages per year, per person—or nearly 15 messages per user per day, every day of the year. Even if you're skeptical about the