CPO

Eye on Privacy
December 1, 2002

Manage Privacy in a Multichannel Environment By Donna Loyle Call it the privacy paradox. Consumers want to purchase products and services in a multichannel environment, and they respond well to personalized marketing strategies, but they still want their privacy protected. What's a direct marketer to do? This was the central question answered during the Sept. 24 audio conference, "Managing Privacy Across Multiple Channels," sponsored by the International Association of Privacy Officers. Moderator James Koenig, chief development and legal officer of ePrivacy Group, a consulting and training company, said the consequences of the paradox are that consumers who are not sure their privacy

Cash in Your Pocket
May 1, 2002

Get List Hygiene Right, or You're Outta Business By Denny Hatch Half of your success in direct mail hinges on two elements: lists and arithmetic. Start with the basic U.S. Postal Service (USPS) statistics. Consumer lists go sour at the rate of 2 percent a month—or roughly 25 percent a year. People move, die, marry and divorce. In the business arena, lists go out of date at the rate of 50 percent a year. A quick way to prove this number is at any business conference. Ask everyone in the room who has a business card today that's different from that of a year

Privacy Revealed
March 1, 2002

By Donna Loyle Undoubtedly you've seen these ads: A credit card company prominently touts "no telemarketing" as one of the benefits of having its card, and an Internet service provider states it won't sell your name and contact information to other companies. It used to be that unless customers specifically requested to see a company's privacy policy, those policies were pretty much downplayed. So what's going on? Has it become trendy to not only dust off your privacy policy, but to actually polish it up for public view? If you're considering following suit, here's what you need to know and do

Adding DRTV to the Mix
October 1, 2001

Thinking Outside the MailBox to Boost Direct Mail and Catalog Response Rates By Norman M. Goldring With postal rates continuing to increase faster than the rate of inflation, it's a great time to consider complementing your direct mail program with direct response television (DRTV) advertising. DRTV—which gained notoriety in the 1970s with half-hour infomercials that ran in the middle of the night hawking everything from Ginzu knives to the latest exercise fad—has come of age and now is used by many mainstream advertisers. Today, such well-known companies as Spiegel, AT&T and Rubbermaid employ direct response television spots to cost-effectively build sales, generate leads and

Below The Radar--And Working (1,977 words)
October 1, 2001

Mailers are having success with package Inserts, co-ops, Blow-ins and statement stuffers—they'd just rather not talk about it By Alicia Orr The title for this piece came from a conversation I had with Leon Henry during the Annual Catalog Conference in Boston last June. "You know," said Henry, chairman of Leon Henry Inc., "inserts fly below the radar screen. We're quite a large industry if you'd take the time to look. We're a factor and no one knows it." So I accepted Henry's challenge and decided to tackle this story. No easy task. It's difficult, if not impossible, to accurately quantify the size of

Adding DRTV to the Mix
October 1, 2001

Thinking Outside the MailBox to Boost Direct Mail and Catalog Response Rates By Norman M. Goldring With postal rates continuing to increase faster than the rate of inflation, it's a great time to consider complementing your direct mail program with direct response television (DRTV) advertising. DRTV—which gained notoriety in the 1970s with half-hour infomercials that ran in the middle of the night hawking everything from Ginzu knives to the latest exercise fad—has come of age and now is used by many mainstream advertisers. Today, such well-known companies as Spiegel, AT&T and Rubbermaid employ direct response television spots to cost-effectively build sales, generate leads and

Ready for Alternate Media Yet?
June 1, 2001

By Hallie Mummert Next month, the postal rates will rise again for the second time this year. Here's a little more salt for the wound: In the past seven months, your postage costs most likely have increased by an average of $14/M to $16/M for letter-size mailings and $18/M to $33/M for flat-size mailings. Is it any wonder that managers and brokers of alternate media programs are seeing more interest in these less costly alternatives to solo direct mail? "Anytime you see an increase on a fixed cost of doing business or a declining of response rates, you will find mailers