American List Counsel (ALC)

Prospecting Push
May 1, 2005

By Alicia Orr Suman A variety of strategies—including delving deeper into acquisition lists, increasing space advertising and using the Internet—are helping Wolferman's reach its true potential. Wolferman's catalog was a business with far more potential than was being tapped when Williams Foods purchased it from former parent Sara Lee Corp. in 1999. Steve Trollinger, vice president of Shawnee Mission, Kan. consulting firm J. Schmid & Associates, and someone who has worked with this specialty foods catalog firm since 2000, recalls, "Not only did Wolferman's prior management fail to take advantage of opportunities in building the business from a list perspective, they really were

Fire Up Your List Rental Income
January 1, 2005

By Hallie Mummert The challenge of finding quality lists to rent has changed quite a bit in the last year or two. Some marketers have seen their best-performing prospecting lists cool off, while lists that were marginal at best are now hot. And with fewer new files coming on to the market, says Pam Mulligan, vice president, list management, at MKTG Services, a full-service list firm in Newtown Square, Pa., marketers are forced to dig deeper into the names already available for rent to unearth warmer prospects. Marketers want more than just a list these days, said Diane Tancredi, when she spoke in

TM0803_Market Focus, Pet Owners
August 1, 2003

By Alicia Orr Suman Ask a dog lover to name his family members and he'll likely include Fido along with his wife and kids. "That's the nature of the pet owner," says Geoff Walker, CEO of PetFoodDirect.com, an Internet seller of pet food and other pet products. Particularly when it comes to dogs and cats, pets are seen as part of the family, and as such, people want the best for their pets—from toys and treats to food and healthcare. Last year, the Pet Food Institute reported there were more than 75 million pet

Anatomy of an E-mail Data Card
January 1, 2003

By Hallie Mummert Reading a data card for an e-mail address list is much easier than deciphering hieroglyphics, especially if you're familiar with data cards for postal address lists. Rather than reinvent the wheel, list managers use the same template for both list types to provide a uniform research tool for list brokers and marketers. While the format may be familiar, you can't put your brain on auto-pilot when perusing potential e-mail list test options. Some irregularities exist that require your attention. Here is an analysis of the typical e-mail list data card to provide you with some research pointers. Counts Most lists will

List Research is Key to Finding New Prospects
January 1, 2003

By Dolores Ryan Babcock When I started my career in direct marketing, this industry was very different than it is today, and I was working with package inserts instead of lists. The basic research techniques I learned then and have refined over time haven't changed in the intervening years, though almost everything else in the business has. The first step in researching the list universe is to look again ... and AGAIN ... at the offer. This is probably the most important step, and one no broker or mailer can afford to overlook. The product or service and the way it is being

Market Focus-Amateur Photographers (958 words)
December 3, 2002

By Paul Barbagallo On the basis of their salaries, most professional photographers lack the spending power to merit attractive direct mail offers. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual income of salaried photographers was $22,300 in 2000. But amateur photographers—anyone from the retired, aspiring portraitist to the stock-broker who travels on the weekends to capture nature with his lens—represent a profitable market segment fit for myriad offers. "Amateur photographers are simply those people out striving to perfect their passion for picture-taking," asserts Mike Gural of American List Counsel, manager of the Outdoor Photographer magazine

Amateur Photographers
December 1, 2002

By Paul Barbagallo On the basis of their salaries, most professional photographers lack the spending power to merit attractive direct mail offers. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual income of salaried photographers was $22,300 in 2000. But amateur photographers—anyone from the retired, aspiring portraitist to the stock-broker who travels on the weekends to capture nature with his lens—represent a profitable market segment fit for myriad offers. "Amateur photographers are simply those people out striving to perfect their passion for picture-taking," asserts Mike Gural of American List Counsel, manager of the Outdoor Photographer magazine subscriber file. "The subscribers

Liberal Political Donors
November 1, 2002

By Paul Barbagallo As the Bush administration continues to inspire fear in the hearts of America's liberals—enough to get them to ink up a fat check to the democratic cause of their choice—the albatross of characterizing this donor market persists for left-wing fund-raisers. Unlike conservatives, who are typically affluent, family-oriented, well-educated and suburban, liberals are more pervasive throughout society, thus difficult to encapsulate with a quick snapshot. "For the most part, the conservative donor market is a very cut and dry group of individuals. The liberal market [however], is very large and very hard to pinpoint," avows Bart Loring, president and founder of

Become a List "E-seller"
June 1, 2002

By Stacy Girt The frantic call comes at 4:45 p.m., just as you're getting ready to call it a day. It's your client. "I need more names to meet my mail volume," he announces. "Now!" "No problem," you reply confidently as you log on to your online list Web site. No, you don't have to call a list manager or wait for a fax. You don't need to pull out all the stops to get a list overnighted on disk to your lettershop. You simply grab counts based on the target audience profile, submit a list order and e-mail a link so he

List leaders discuss today's Challenging market (2,023 words)
November 1, 2001

By Kate Mason If mailers look to the list industry as a barometer of direct marketing's overall health, they need not pull on their rainhats just yet! Even as uncertainty grips most markets—from catalogs to publishing—list companies are still expressing optimism about the future. John Papalia, president and CEO of Statlistics, poses a common attitude: "We may head into a long and difficult period of time and direct marketing has never known such a period or experienced a prolonged war time economy. I'm optimistic that America will flourish, but I'm hesitant to make any predictions right now." Despite the effects of a staggering