Paul Barbagallo

Paul Barbagallo
Back With a Bangtail

Once-defunct cataloger Fingerhut—known for extending credit and goods to lower-income consumers—is back in the mailstream with its first continuity program since Federated Department Stores Inc. sold the company last year. Fingerhut customers were targeted in the fourth quarter of 2003 with a jewelry continuity program created by marketing services firm Holsted Marketing. Two sets of direct mail pieces went out in the second half of October, each to 50,000 people. Another 100,000 were sent via bangtails—offers on extra flaps attached to Fingerhut monthly remittance envelopes—in early November. “The idea [behind this campaign] was to define what products and offers work, and prepare for next

DNC Registry Fuels Online Market Research

By Paul Barbagallo Even though market research firms are exempt from new do-not-call rules, many consumers are still reluctant to participate in phone surveys. Much to the chagrin of the teleservices industry and market research firms, this increasing number of consumer refusals may invalidate research studies that rely on broad and consistent participation. As such, many market researchers are seeking alternative means to compile studies. "The explosive growth of online research is clearly one of the dominant trends in the market research industry," notes J. Walker Smith, president of Yankelovich. According to the most recent Marketing Research Industry Report, in 2003, more

The Ins Of Outers

Cost-Effective, Response-Driving Bells and Whistles for Your Outer Envelope By Paul Barbagallo As part of the pressure to maintain the vigor and allure of long-term direct mail packages under budget constraints, mailers must vet the outer envelope. Don Schoenleber, vice president of sales, new product and business development for Vertis Direct Marketing Services, says in today's rough economic climate, the outer envelope has to do more of its job than ever before. "Say you have a #10 [envelope package], for example. It may be that this particular format can carry your message and deliver a reasonable response rate," Schoenleber says. "But

Four Ad Serving Tips (286 words)

By Paul Barbagallo Online advertising continues to prove its effectiveness for marketers while becoming a creative, yet standardized, medium. According to DoubleClick's First Quarter 2003 Ad Serving Trend Report, based on more than 136 billion ads from clients, rich media continues to increase as a percentage of all ads served in the first quarter of 2003. The research underscores the importance of rich media, view-through measurement and dayparting, a practice of promoting different content during different segments of the day. To optimize the performance of your campaigns, DoubleClick offers the following four ad serving tips: 1. Set up trackable rich media

TM0703_Market Focus, Motorcycle Enthusiasts

By Paul Barbagallo Motorcycle Madness was once a condition that almost solely infected the 350-pound Hell's Angel type who lives in old blue jeans and dirty leather. Today, motorcycling in America is more for sport than for transportation, and it is more popular with all ranges of society than at any other time, says Buzz Kanter, editor in chief and publisher of motorcycle magazines American Iron and RoadBike. "Our readers range from dentists to guys missing teeth," Kanter jokes. "We have found much of the growing popularity with motorcycles is from people well into their careers, usually in their late

Inteview with Christopher G. Cleghorn, Easter Seals (405 words)

By Paul Barbagallo Easter Seals' Executive Vice President of Direct and Interactive Marketing Chris Cleghorn shares a few of his fund-raising challenges and successes with Target Marketing. Target Marketing: Tell me about your most successful campaign. Cleghorn: It would be the complete redesign of our Easter Seals seal acquisition [package]—the one that actually uses the "seals." We tested it five years ago and rolled out the campaign the next year. Our organization had been mailing seals for about 60 years. It was the original source of our identity. The reworking of the package into a new format with stronger elements and more effective use

Shared Vision

By Paul Barbagallo Like any successful marriage, even one with cyclical doses of quarreling and reconciling, a sound mailer-list broker partnership is founded on trust. Fostering a relationship of open data exchange and healthy communication is the key to realizing the potential of this mailer-broker union, list gurus attest. "We view our vendors as partners in our business," shares Bill Buchler, vice president of marketing for home maintenance catalog HSN Improvements. "A strong partnership allows for trust, and because of that partnership, I trust [my list broker] with my data. If you're in a situation where you don't have that level of trust, then

Marketing to Teens (1,234 words)

By Paul Barbagallo Numbering more than 70 million people born between 1980 and 1996, Generation Y is the largest group of teenagers in American history, dwarfing even the baby boomers. Until the economic downturn of the last few years, their lives have been spent in a period of prosperity. Armed with cell phones, Walkmans and pagers, today's teenagers have grown up in the age of instant global communication, media saturation and material excess. "Several years ago, the country was in the tail end of a decade-long economic boom," says Michael Wood, vice president of Northbrook, IL-based market research firm Teenage Research Unlimited (TRU). "Even

TM Nuts 'n Bolts - Book Club

By Paul Barbagallo Diary of a Consumer Mind-Reader In his new book "How Customers Think: Essential Insights Into the Mind of the Market," marketing expert Gerald Zaltman offers this advice to managers baffled by consumer behavior: dig deeper. Zaltman, a professor of marketing at Harvard Business School, argues that when it comes to getting into the minds of consumers, marketers have only scratched the surface. Ninety-five percent of all thought—including what we really think about products and what will influence our decisions to buy—happens in the unconscious mind, beyond our own awareness, Zaltman says. Conventional marketing research tools such as focus

Nuts 'n Bolts -5-Minute Interview with John Squires, Time Inc.

By Paul Barbagallo Target Marketing spent a few moments on the phone with this year's inductee into The Direct Marketing Association (The DMA) Circulation Hall of Fame, John Squires, executive vice president, Time Inc. Squires' responsibilities include overseeing Time Inc. consumer marketing, Time Inc. Interactive, and Entertainment Weekly magazine. Target Marketing: In this tough economic climate, what is one thing circulation directors can do to maintain their circulation? Squires: I think probably the area with the most opportunity right now is to look at the marketing flexibility that's been provided by the revision of the ABC rules that were put into effect a

Small Office/Home Office

By Paul Barbagallo Currently, 15 million small businesses are active in America, if you define a small business as an enterprise with one to 500 employees. By the fourth quarter of 2002, more than half of these small businesses saw improvement in sales from the three previous quarters, according to a survey conducted by Business Know-How, a small business online service for home office professionals and small businesses. A recent study by financial experts Cattles Invoice Finance reveals that, compared to 2001, almost 80 percent of small companies and self-run businesses enjoyed the same or higher profits in 2002, even though just under

Hispanics

By Paul Barbagallo In just four decades, the U.S. Hispanic market has more than quadrupled in size, from 6.9 million potential consumers in 1960 to more than 35.3 million in 2000. Hispanic buying power is increasing faster than that of any other minority group, notes Jeff Humpreys, director of the Selig Center for Economic Growth at the University of Georgia's Terry College of Business. The U.S. Hispanic population currently represents approximately $600 billion in total household spending. Humpreys projects that by 2007, Hispanic buying power will top $926.1 billion. "There's been a huge boom," confirms Lori Collins, director of business development, FocusUSA, a list

Market Focus-Amateur Photographers (958 words)

By Paul Barbagallo On the basis of their salaries, most professional photographers lack the spending power to merit attractive direct mail offers. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual income of salaried photographers was $22,300 in 2000. But amateur photographers—anyone from the retired, aspiring portraitist to the stock-broker who travels on the weekends to capture nature with his lens—represent a profitable market segment fit for myriad offers. "Amateur photographers are simply those people out striving to perfect their passion for picture-taking," asserts Mike Gural of American List Counsel, manager of the Outdoor Photographer magazine

Amateur Photographers

By Paul Barbagallo On the basis of their salaries, most professional photographers lack the spending power to merit attractive direct mail offers. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual income of salaried photographers was $22,300 in 2000. But amateur photographers—anyone from the retired, aspiring portraitist to the stock-broker who travels on the weekends to capture nature with his lens—represent a profitable market segment fit for myriad offers. "Amateur photographers are simply those people out striving to perfect their passion for picture-taking," asserts Mike Gural of American List Counsel, manager of the Outdoor Photographer magazine subscriber file. "The subscribers

Business Outlook 2003

Industry experts get serious about privacy, postage, telemarketing and more. Reported by Paul Barbagallo, Brian Howard & Hallie Mummert Privacy. The U.S. Postal Service. Telemarketing. Congress. These four topics dominated the discussion at Target Marketing's Business Outlook 2003 breakfast, held during the Direct Marketing Association conference in San Francisco in October. We gathered a distinguished panel of industry experts to outline the major issues direct marketers will face next year, and found that the more the industry changes, the more it stays the same. When Target Marketing convened a roundtable seven years ago to discuss the future of direct marketing, we gnashed teeth over