Alicia Orr

Alicia Orr
Editors Notes

By Alicia Orr Wanted: Technology That's Proven I Don't have a "Palm." Of course you know I'm speaking of the hand-held wireless personal computing devices that are so prevalent at every business meeting, trade show and airport terminal—or any other place where business persons converge of late. I'm intrigued by these and other personal digital assistants but haven't ventured over the line into buying one due to two fears: 1) I worry that by the time I purchase, set up and learn to use my "Palm," it will have become obsolete. 2) I fear I'll screw the thing up some how—or a computer bug

On Target - Can You Guess Who I Am?

By Alicia Orr, Editor in Chief, Target Marketing think you know a person by what she buys? Think again. I for one appear on the subscriber files of publications from House & Garden and Vogue to Fortune, The Wall Street Journal and Dog Fancy. An avid catalog and Web shopper, lately I've bought furniture, household goods, gifts, kids' clothes and baby items. I also shop the 'Net for books and music (recent CD purchases include the Backstreet Boys, Dave Matthews Band and Faith Hill). Plus, my husband and I like to research and book vacations online. So who am I? Can you tell

In Search Of Spin-off Opportunities?

By Alicia Orr Your list manager can be a critical source of market research information, according to Geoff Batrouney, executive vice president of Estee Marketing Group. How? "When the list is for rent and you see certain instances over and over of the same people renting your list, perhaps that's a clue to your next line extension or spin-off," Batrouney suggested to attendees at the CatalogTech Conference held March 12-14 in New York City. "Don't fight the numbers!" he says. Included in Batrouney's advice for those seeking spin-off or start-up opportunities: 1. Stay very close to the customer and his or her

List Selection Strategies (1,045 words)

By Alicia Orr An interview with Paul Goldberg Want to Know How to Pick the Right Lists? Of all the elements that go into a direct mail effort, the single most important one is the list. Think about it: If you don't reach the right audience, no matter how brilliant your creative or how enticing your offer, the effort is destined to fail. "Too little thought goes into lists," affirms Paul Goldberg, a veteran direct marketing consultant who has worked in the industry for more than 40 years. Goldberg, whose firm, P-J Promotions specializes in circulation marketing, points out another reason why list

Direct Mail Sows Solid Relationships (1,097 words)

by Alicia Orr Before loyalty marketing was all the buzz, a Midwest home improvement retailer, Quality Stores, began working its house-file data to find and reward its loyal customers. That was in 1991, and during the last decade, the Muskegon, MI-based company has used analysis and campaign management tools to grow and improve what's become its 700,000-member ThankQ Quality Advantage program. During the same period, the 38-year-old Quality Stores has grown, most recently through the 1999 merger with Central Tractor Farm and Country, which had been in business 60-plus years. The combined company now has 340 locations in 31 states and describes itself

Direct Mail Sows Solid Relationships (1,098 words)

by Alicia Orr Before loyalty marketing was all the buzz, a Midwest home improvement retailer, Quality Stores, began working its house-file data to find and reward its loyal customers. That was in 1991, and during the last decade, the Muskegon, MI-based company has used analysis and campaign management tools to grow and improve what's become its 700,000-member ThankQ Quality Advantage program. During the same period, the 38-year-old Quality Stores has grown, most recently through the 1999 merger with Central Tractor Farm and Country, which had been in business 60-plus years. The combined company now has 340 locations in 31 states and describes itself

Direct Marketer of the Year Grolier's Dante Cirilli (3,801 wor

by Alicia Orr Was it fact or rumor, I asked Dan Cirilli, inquiring as to the truth of tales I had heard that he started out in the mail room at Grolier. Cirilli's response: "I grew up in the Bronx and attended the New York School of Printing, a special high school teaching the graphic arts. I then went on to City College at night. It was Robert B. Clarke, an important figure in the history of direct marketing who was executive vice president of Grolier at the time, who hired me, and yes, it was to work in the mail room!" On his

List Testing - Parameters & Strategies

by Alicia Orr No one will dispute the fact that testing lists is important. The list has the greatest impact on the success or failure of the mailing. "Whereas creative tests may cause 1.5-percent to 3-percent variations in response, the right or wrong mailing list can sway results by a thousand percent!" suggests David O. Schwartz, president of 21st Century Marketing, a list broker/manager in Farmingdale, NY. But how much should you test and where should you look for list test ideas? The amount of list testing a mailer should do is a direct function of the maturity of its direct mail program, Schwartz

10 "Musts" for Outbound Calls (1,103 words)

by Alicia Orr What differentiates a good outbound telemarketing call from a bad one? We've all been on the receiving end of poor quality sales calls ("On Target," TM, Jan. '98, p. 39). So how can we ensure that the telemarketing programs we put into place are well-targeted, professionally executed and, ultimately, successful? "There are so many different ingredients or facets of a successful telemarketing program that it's tough to single out a few," asserts Wayne Harper, vice president of West Telemarketing's Dedicated Services Division in San Antonio, TX. But in his eyes, three "musts" that stand out are list, offer