Think twice before you "set it and forget it," marketers. In this episode of "What Were They Thinking?" Melissa shares a tone-deaf email her colleague received from Expedia, despite the flight to Miami being cancelled by ... you know ...

  Show More »
More What Were They Thinking? Videos
Videos In Other Channels
Comments
  • Karen

    So very true! As a marketer at a Florida based company, we learned a lot about disaster recovery this week, but we also were VERY cautious about our marketing and social posts.

    • Melissa Ward

      Thanks for taking the time to watch and comment, and I hope everyone in your company (and in all the areas hit by the hurricanes in the past few weeks) is safe!

  • tmana

    Along with the _happy_ occasions for travel to Miami, there are also the sad ones. Maybe you’re not going to Miami to _visit_ your elderly parents (happy), but to transport their bodies back home for burial (NOT happy).

    • Melissa Ward

      You’re absolutely right … either way, that automated email should have been pulled. Thanks for watching!!!

  • Brian Wagner

    KUDOS!!! I hear the term “set it and forget it” as often as I hear marketers describe email deployments as blasts. Both make my head spin. Yet another great “bad” example of where a company’s IT or tech team builds the digital widget, QCs and flips the ON switch.

    A classic case of “who is minding the store”. This mentality of “set it and forget it” can irrevocably hurt marketers. Just because the latest software tools enable automated triggers and transactional messaging, still need humans to monitor and step in when called for.

    • Melissa Ward

      Brian you hit the nail on the head here! Automation is great … until it isn’t. It shouldn’t be the silver bullet that helps marketers get time and resources back, but instead the tool that helps them use their time and resources efficiently (while still minding “the store.”)

  • Brian Wagner

    Hi Melissa, I have another WWTT experience with Expedia.
    In sum I had contacted Expedia 3x by email to explain that they were mistakenly sending another customer’s travel itinerary and booking confirms to my attention. In response I was receiving automated response messaging informing that the email account I was using to communicate this issue was not their other customers; hence couldn’t help me. I then took to Twitter, but no response. Then I finally tried DM in Twitter and that got an exchange going. I gave all the information about the other person, the similarities in our email addresses and asked if they could contact the other customer and explain why they may not have been getting their confirmations. I was finally told they would not contact the other person. Ironically the other person’s name is Brianna Wagner and I am Brian Wagner. According to Gmail, doesn’t matter where the dots or # of dots used in your email address, if the emails are very similar, which they are, both emails would be attributed to the legacy email; in this case mine. I have not way of reaching Brianna because my messages come right back to my inbox. I tried. Expedia could have made a call to their customer to explain this weird situation and won over both Brianna and myself. But NO. FAILURE.

    • Melissa Ward

      Ugh, how annoying! And a waste of your time as you tried to help THEM and one of their customers (who might not be a customer anymore, especially if she can’t get important emails like this!). Thanks for sharing.