5 Surprising Email Metrics That Transform Businesses

Email is the most effective under-utilized marketing tool available. The instant revenue generated with each send lures marketers into the trap of sending one sale email after another. Investing the time to create a program that builds long term relationships seems almost wasteful. After all, the low hanging fruit is easy to get and there are so many other things that need doing.

Measuring the following metrics begins the process that moves email programs from one-off promotions to campaigns designed to acquire prospects and convert them into loyal customers. The people who subscribe to emails are highly qualified candidates for long-term relationships. They are interested in your company’s offerings and have given you permission to share information with them. Providing more than the latest sale prices opens the door to unlimited potential.

  1. Acquisition—How many prospects did your email program acquire last year? What percentage was converted to customers? Email is an exceptional prospecting tool. It is low cost with potentially high return. Create a specific process designed to acquire prospects and convert them into customers. Measure it carefully so you have benchmarks for improvement. Set specific goals to insure that the marketing team’s focus extends beyond the daily revenue stream.
  2. Retention—How well are you keeping customers coming back? Who is participating in your email program? Are they platinum customers with consistent purchase patterns of regular priced and discounted items? Are they discount customers who only buy sale items? (This type may be mislabeled if you only send discount emails.) Or, are they hit-&-run shoppers who subscribed with their first purchase but have never ordered again? Knowing the retention rates and customer types helps create a program that keeps customers coming back.
  3. Engagement—Direct marketers know that motivating people to do something increases the likelihood that they will make a purchase. This is why direct mail pieces have scratch-offs, peel and stick labels, and other devices designed to motivate people to act. Email is a tool that makes it easy for people to do much more than that. It has the option for the two way communication that builds relationships. Personal messages encourage people to respond emotionally and create connections between customer and company. Strong connections keep competitors from stealing customers.
  4. Lifespan—Email customers have a different lifespan from customers acquired or active via other channels. Knowing how people behave from first purchase to last provides information that can be used to fine-tune the email program. Monitoring this data helps identify trends. Watch for course changing events that shorten or lengthen individual lifespans so you can adjust marketing and service as needed.
  5. Comparable Values—Customers acquired via the same channel who have similar activity typically have comparable value in annual sales and profitability. A wide variance in comparable value provides an early warning system before the bottom line starts dropping. If you see value inconsistencies, look for causes that include marketing fatigue, service issues, increased competition, and niche saturation.

The people who subscribe to your email program are like the ones who receive direct mail pieces or catalogs. They respond to the same triggers, so the tactics that work for direct mail work for electronic media too. Design a strategy that moves beyond sale flyers to build a loyal following. Creating an email marketing strategy designed to acquire prospects, convert them to customers, and keeps them coming back for more is simply good business guaranteed to generate a great return.

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