Moya Greene

Sandra Vidulich is so excited about the leather boots she ordered through Amazon that she rips open the box in front of the postman and tries them on. "I looove them," she declares, as the driveway at her tree-lined home in rural New Zealand briefly becomes a catwalk. "They're cool." For now, a boom in Internet shopping is helping keep alive moribund postal services across the developed world. But the core of their business—letters—is declining precipitously, and data from many countries indicate that parcels alone won't be enough to save them. The once-proud postal services that helped build modern society

The marketing industry “must continue to improve its creative approach and use of data to ensure that direct mail remains relevant and of interest to consumers” to avoid being seen as junk mail, according to Chris Combemale, executive director of DMA. Combemale’s warning comes off the back of the news that half of all letters delivered by Royal Mail are marketing communications. He adds: “Poor consumer insight leads to junk mail, which is bad for business. Cutting out unnecessary direct mail marketing will help to not only change consumer perceptions but also improve companies’ return on investment.”

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