Jayson Blair

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

“Did we do anything wrong?”

Anyone that asks that question is probably guilty.

The most egregious lede I have ever seen in 60 years of reading The New York Times:
My wife and I sat cross-legged on the floor of a local Barnes & Noble store recently, surrounded by several large piles of books. We were searching for interior design ideas for a new home that we are planning to buy.

As we lobbed the books back and forth, sharing kitchen layouts and hardwood floor textures, we snapped a dozen pictures of book pages with our iPhones. We wanted to share them later with our contractor.

After a couple of hours of this, we placed the books back on the shelf and went home, without buying a thing. But the digital images came home with us in our smartphones.

Later that evening, I felt a few pangs of guilt. I asked my wife: Did we do anything wrong? And, I wondered, had we broken any laws by photographing those pages?

It's not as if we had destroyed anything: We didn't rip out any pages. But if we had wheeled a copier machine into the store, you can be sure the management would have soon wheeled us and the machine out of there.

But our smartphones really functioned as hand-held copiers. Did we indeed go too far?

Yes, you and your wife went too far.

And your tacky little iPhones’ theft of copyright wasn’t the half of it.

Plagiarism does "not go gentle into that good night."* *Dylan Thomas May 9, 2006: Vol. 2, Issue No. 36 IN THE NEWS Raytheon board cuts CEO pay after book flap ARLINGTON, Va— Raytheon Co.'s board said on Wednesday that it cut its chief executive's compensation in response to what others have called plagiarism in a management booklet, a penalty that one person familiar with the matter said could cost him $1 million. —Jim Wolf, Bill Rigby and Kevin Drawbaugh, Reuters, May 3, 2006 Young Harvard author's book deal canceled NEW YORK — A Harvard University sophomore's

Another shameful chapter in The New York Times story comes to an end Nov. 17, 2005: Vol. 1, Issue No. 49 IN THE NEWS Judy Miller Fights Back with Letters to Dowd and Calame NEW YORK--Judith Miller will not go gently into that good night. Her public relations offensive, which had already taken her to CNN with Larry King and to National Public Radio and elsewhere, now includes angry published letters to two of her antagonists, former colleague Maureen Dowd and New York Times Public Editor Barney Calame. --Joe Strupp, Editor & Publisher, Nov. 13, 2005 For us news junkies, the professional demise

Editors as chumps and four lives ruined Vol. 1 Issue #28 IN THE NEWS CARBONDALE, Ill. - Kodee Kennings' story was pure gold. For nearly two years, the motherless 8-year-old spoke and wrote movingly of her struggle to deal with her soldier father being shipped off to fight in Iraq, and Southern Illinois University's student newspaper chronicled her thoughts in its pages. But there was no Kodee Kennings, and the elaborate hoax exposed Friday left The Daily Egyptian embarrassed. --Jim Suhr "Series is exposed as hoax, retracted by student paper" Associated Press, Aug. 29, 2005

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