Ed Markey

Marketing Sustainably: What's Going on Beyond and Beneath the Green? A blog posting questions, opportunities, concerns and observations on sustainability in marketing.

Chet Dalzell has 25 years of public relations management and expertise in service to leading brands in consumer, donor, patient and business-to-business markets, and in the field of integrated direct marketing. He serves on the Direct Marketing Association International ECHO Awards Board of Governors, as an adviser to the Direct Marketing Club of New York and Direct Marketing Idea eXchange, and is a former member of DMA's Committee on the Environment and Social Responsibility, where he led the Marketing & Communications Public Outreach Strategy Working Group (2005-2012).

Chet co-developed the first professional certificate program in environmentally responsible marketing within the United States. He also served on the United States Postal Service Greening the Mail Task Force (2007-2010), and led its Life Cycle of Mail Subcommittee. He loves UConn Basketball (men's and women's) and Nebraska Football (that's just men, at this point), too!

Email Chet below, or reach him at Twitter or LinkedIn.

Members of Congress, and even the White House, seem to forget or ignore that their very own campaigns depended on the flow of information about citizens and individuals and population segments to inform their campaigns. Their respective elections prove that data and marketing in concert are very effective, especially for incumbents. Yet listen to a few among our leaders, and you'd think data-driven marketing is a consumer privacy problem begging for a government solution

Privacy advocates and trade groups are clashing over how to build consumer protections into the fast-growing data broker industry as they await the results of two long-running investigations that could shape Washington’s approach to the sector. Both the Federal Trade Commission and Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee launched studies of data brokers last year, seeking information about how the firms operate and do business. The reviews, which are ongoing, have targeted companies including Acxiom, Experian and Datalogix, which collect information about people from sources online and offline and sell it to other businesses

Two days ago, NBCNews.com's "Red Tape Chronicles" used Instagram's recent policy change as a chance to attack marketing data providers. Click through to the story to read more: "Instagram's abrupt change of terms this week created a predictable Internet chatter bomb, as Web users erupted in anger that the firm might violate their privacy and property rights. Sadly, there is no such outrage at companies which buy and sell our privacy as their business model—and much less interest in promising efforts to rein them in. What do they

The emergence of "big data" as an enterprise concern for many businesses and organizations is, as with most trends, both an opportunity and a concern. I recently was involved in reviewing new and recent Aberdeen Research on "Big Data"—how it is defined, how it is changing information volume (astounding in quantity), variety (both structured and unstructured, with tremendous pressure to integrate and make sense of it), and velocity (pushing the insight, analytics and business rules that flow from such data to lines of business that can best profit from it).

The controversy over Carrier IQ's diagnostic tracking software on millions of cellphones caught the attention of privacy hawks in Congress late last year. Now, one of them, Rep. Ed Markey (D-Mass.), is floating draft legislation that would require companies to disclose to consumers when they're being tracked. The Mobile Device Privacy Act would require companies to let consumers know what types of information are being collected, which companies get the information and how the data are being used. It would also require companies to get consent from consumers before information is collected, shared or transmitted.

The Direct Marketing Association (DMA) today expressed strong concerns with the discussion draft of a “Do Not Track Kids Act” released by Representatives Ed Markey (D-MA) and Joe Barton (R-TX).  The DMA described the draft bill, which would significantly change the standard set in the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998 (COPPA), as unnecessary and “off track.”

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