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Carolyn Goodman

The Power Punch

By Carolyn Goodman

About Carolyn

A blog that challenges B-to-B marketers to learn, share, question, and focus on getting it right—the first time.

Carolyn Goodman is President/Creative Director of Goodman Marketing Partners. An award-winning creative director, writer and in-demand speaker, Carolyn has spent her 30-year career helping both B-to-B and B-to-C clients cut through business challenges in order to deliver strategically sound, creatively brilliant marketing solutions that deliver on program objectives. To keep her mind sharp, Carolyn can be found most evenings in the boxing ring, practicing various combinations.

You can find her at the Goodman Marketing website, on LinkedIn, or on Twitter @CarolynGoodman.

 

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Social Media Is a Waste of Time for B-to-B

22
 

There. I've said it out loud. Now let the crucifixion begin. But before you write a retaliatory remark, hear me through.

While I strongly believe that B-to-B marketing strategies can leverage many different marketing channels, I don't think social media is at the top of my "things-I-must-do-to-help-drive-my-business-forward" list. Why? Because too many brands still need to get their act together in the basics, before spending precious resources chasing their tails on platforms that will yield very little to the bottom line.

So before you write me a nasty post suggesting that I'm old and out of touch with the times, consider these basics about your B-to-B product/service:

  • Website: Yep. This is where first impressions are made, so it better be designed and organized for easy navigation. And, it better be intuitive—allowing visitors to find their way around and get to the information they're seeking without having to fall down a rat hole or two. Is the information arranged in a logical fashion (no, not the way your company wants it, but how your target audience THINKS)? Can information be downloaded and printed without sucking my printer dry of ink? Are there high-end videos to watch that are informative, engaging and helpful? Relevant case studies to my industry? Quotes/endorsements from users? White papers that truly examine an industry issue without making self-serving claims about your company? On a scale of 1 to 10, what score would you give to your website? If it's less than an "8," stop spending time on social media initiatives and get your website in order first.
  • Customer Service: Have you ever called your own toll-free line or emailed your own company as a "mystery shopper?" Who answers and how quickly? How are you treated? Is it easy to get your questions answered without being transferred? What kind of follow up is in place? Many companies separate this step from the rest of their marketing efforts and it often exemplifies everything that is wrong with your organization, which no amount of social media can fix. Remember, it's easier to sell more to an existing customer then it is to find a sell to a new prospect, so if the after-purchase experience is less than stellar, stop chasing your tail and concentrate on getting your customer service house in order.
  • Industry Presence: No matter what product or service you sell, there are probably one or more industry organizations/conferences/events that attract potential prospects. This is where many targets go seeking information and your brand needs to be part of the discussion. Attending trade shows does NOT necessarily mean plunking down cash to have a booth on the trade show floor and handing out useless promo items, although that can be helpful if done right. What it does mean is that you need to get engaged in the event. Find out how to become a speaker, or participate in a roundtable discussion. Build awareness of your brand and your knowledge about issues facing the industry and the role that your product/service plays to help solve that issue. This is the original world of social media—not an online, digital presence that has no real value unless someone "clicks" but true engagement and dialogue between two individuals where one has a pain and the other one can solve it.
  • Relationship Building: Before LinkedIn and webinars, we all attended conferences, listened to speakers, met over cocktails and exchanged business cards. We followed up, stayed in touch and reconnected when we needed help finding useful products or services. I admit that I love LinkedIn as a tool for organizing my contacts, but the Discussion Groups can be quickly taken off topic or slow to take off in any meaningful way. If you have a solid topic that is of value to your industry, hire a researcher/writer and get an article/whitepaper written. Then share it with potential prospects, post it to one of your industry sites, send it to an editor of your trade publication. Every digital outlet is begging for valuable content and you could place yourself at the top of the knowledge chain through this endeavor. And everyone likes doing business with someone who knows what they're talking about.

Speaking of LinkedIn, if you're in sales, you need to have an up-to-date LinkedIn profile posted. And please, use a professional picture of yourself, and not one of you and your dog or the one taken by the camera on top of your computer (which is creepy looking, by the way). When you talk about your current employer, make sure you're using consistent language about your brand. Look to your marketing or PR department for the 25-word description you know exists. Make sure you create a thorough profile and reach out to past customers / clients for endorsements—they do get read, believe it or not.

If you can honestly say that all five of these marketing tools are optimized and working like well-oiled machines, then by all means spend your time, money and resources on Facebook pages, Pinterest sites and Tweets. If you prove their value, write me—show me the money.

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COMMENTS

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Most Recent Comments:
Bill Krueger - Posted on November 30, 2012
You won't get crucified by me! We do a lot of work in b-to-b, and honestly don't get the question very often. We've found most b-to-b clients are sorely deficient in basic marketing strategy and initiatives that could seriously move them forward in their markets, but their internal staff, which are often displaced engineers or customer service folks, are all responsible for at least 2 jobs. We try to get them to concentrate on the basics first. However, they also sometimes make things out to be bigger than they have to be- it's not required to do a PR splash for every new product, new training class, or staff and pricing updates. A simple post to their web site, and a Twitter post with link back work just fine for that, and everybody can afford the time for 140 characters. Of course there need to be policies and strategy, but most find it do-able. Small steps!
Click here to view archived comments...
Archived Comments:
Bill Krueger - Posted on November 30, 2012
You won't get crucified by me! We do a lot of work in b-to-b, and honestly don't get the question very often. We've found most b-to-b clients are sorely deficient in basic marketing strategy and initiatives that could seriously move them forward in their markets, but their internal staff, which are often displaced engineers or customer service folks, are all responsible for at least 2 jobs. We try to get them to concentrate on the basics first. However, they also sometimes make things out to be bigger than they have to be- it's not required to do a PR splash for every new product, new training class, or staff and pricing updates. A simple post to their web site, and a Twitter post with link back work just fine for that, and everybody can afford the time for 140 characters. Of course there need to be policies and strategy, but most find it do-able. Small steps!