Open Enrollment | Subscribe to Target Marketing HERE
Connect
Follow us on
Advertisement
 

When Your Work Spirals Out of Control …

It’s time to change your business model

December 11, 2012 By Denny Hatch
4

When Peggy and I moved to Philadelphia 20 years ago and were looking for a doctor, someone recommended "Dr. Tom Harrow" (not his actual name), with a practice five blocks from our home across the street from the teaching hospital where he's clinical assistant professor of medicine.

I went to see him for a physical and he was (and is) terrific. Soft spoken, he asked a lot of questions, listened to my replies and took extensive notes. And he examined me expertly from toes to nose.

Peggy and I have since been back to him numerous times and he has been simply great—thorough, meticulous and a diligent note-taker. The specialists he has referred us to are the top people in the Philadelphia area.

On the wall of the little examining room is a huge framed montage of sports photographs along with badges, sideline permits and tickets. I discovered he was not only head team physician for one of Philadelphia's major sports teams, but also lead internist for another. We see him sometimes on TV ministering banged-up athletes.

With the combined salaries of these two teams being roughly $200 million a year, the owners would be nuts to entrust their precious assets to anything less than a world-class physician. From first-hand experience, I can testify that Dr. Harrow is world-class.

When I turned 65, I went to see Dr. Harrow for something or other and we talked Medicare. I said I assumed that the federal government's Medicare reimbursement payments were lousy and that if there were any tests or treatments he wanted to perform that he would lose money on, I would gladly make up the difference.

His icy response: "Under Medicare, it would be illegal for me to take extra money from you. I could lose my license to practice."

The Downward Spiral
Alas, over the past several years, Dr. Harrow's service deteriorated. Sometimes we would phone in to get a prescription renewed and we'd get no return call. Or the line was busy. It got to the point where I would have to walk over to his office and physically hand the pill bottle to one of the office personnel who would arrange to call it into Rite-Aid.

I started resenting him. We'd make an appointment and then wind up sitting in the crowded waiting room for an hour or more.

 
4

SPONSORED CONTENT

MORE ON DATABASE, LISTS AND CRM >>

FROM THE BOOKSTORE

<i>The Business of Database Marketing</i> covers all the bases for the typical business reader.  It even includes a catalog of the 37 “Best Practices” and a roundup of some of the major “Dos and Don’ts” in making business sense of the world of database marketing.  It will be the one easy-to-read and easy-to-understand guide for putting database marketing and customer relationship management to productive use for every business. The Business of Database Marketing

The Business of Database Marketing covers all the bases for the typical business reader. It even includes a catalog of the 37 “Best Practices” and a roundup of some of the major “Dos and Don’ts” in making business sense of the world of database marketing. It will be the one...

ORDER NOW

 

COMMENTS

Click here to leave a comment...
Comment *
Most Recent Comments: