Are Facebook’s Paid ‘Likes’ a Fraud?

Are paid Facebook likes a fraud?

Does “buying” Facebook likes just force you to buy more Facebook promotion?

Most marketers know you can buy Facebook likes for your business page; Facebook even sells them to you. When you “buy likes,” what really happens is Facebook runs ads across its network to the audiences you targeted, and a percentage of them will decide to like your page. Seems legitimate, right?

Well, Derek Muller, owner of the Veritasium YouTube channel, did some experimenting and research, and he doesn’t think so. Muller doesn’t just think those likes are fraudulent, he thinks they actually force you to buy even more promotion from Facebook just to get your pages read by you own legitimate audience.

Is Muller right? Watch the video below for his full explanation. Then let us know what you think in the comments. Have you tried buying Facebook likes? If so, how did that work out for you?

Thorin McGee is editor-in-chief and content director of Target Marketing and oversees editorial direction and product development for the magazine, website and other channels.
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Comments
  • aptucker

    It’s a total scam by #Facebook! I manage the Facebook pages for five different clients and have noticed the same pattern for each client. When I pay for ads to increase Likes, the page Likes increase. As soon as the ad ends, the page Likes start to disappear. Coincidence? When the exact same thing happens to five totally different business pages, I don’t think it is anything BUT Facebook extorting money from businesses to garner better analytics.

  • Eric Rosenthal

    People think they can just put up a page and it’s on autopilot. No good. If you don’t participate on your own page to post interesting and relevant content to engage people you’re wasting your time or just having false expectations.

  • Eric Rosenthal

    Interesting analysis. I had paid for likes over a year ago thinking it would make the business page look better to just have more likes. I can’t say that it hurt any. The page seems to do well and gains a decent amount of likes now on it’s own. I frequently look at the profiles of new likes and they are always legit.

  • Carol Hornung

    When I launched a public page for my novel, Facebook offered me $50 in credit to purchase "likes." I did so, then, of course, they offered to sell me ads. I did buy an ad on Facebook and it resulted in a few sales, but I find the statistics work the other way ’round. When I make sales through various other avenues (my blog, goodreads, word of mouth), I gain likes on my FB page.

  • GroverTech.Net

    We are a local smart phone repair shop. I went ahead and signed up for Facebook likes for about a month. When I looked at the profiles of folks that liked me, they were geographically all over the US. It seemed like they were just clicking like, just to click like. For the two months that I purchased likes, we got zero response in sales, contact, or anything else. Conclusion, paid Facebook likes are a fraud.

  • Rebecca Cashman

    This really ticks me off. I watched the video earlier (before I got the Target Marketing email this morning). What are our options? Seriously I think Facebook needs to do better at this. Let us market to our own, legitimate fan base. We worked hard to build our business and fans. http://www.facebook.com/detoxfootpads